Education Center

How to remove judgements?
What is a Judgement?

If you default on your debt and don’t try to pay it back to the creditor (or collection agency), they can take you to court. If the court finds in your favor, it enters a judgment against you. As a collection, it is a negative blow to your credit. Today, judgments are not showing on your credit report. While they are a public record, the National Consumer Assistance Plan made it illegal to report judgments on credit reports in most situations. Read More…

How to remove Collections from your credit report

If you have failed to meet a debt obligation, your original creditor will often sell your debt to a debt collector or collection agency. Once your debt ends in collection, this negative information is usually reported to the three major credit bureaus – Experian, Transunion, and Equifax – and damages your credit score. After a certain period of time, a collection account must be removed from your report. If you want to remove it sooner or you think it is a mistake, you can take several actions to try to remove it from your credit report. Read More…

How to remove bankruptcy from credit report?

Bankruptcies are one of the most damaging items that can show up on your credit report. Like lawsuits and tax liens, they are reported as a public record and accumulate your credit score. If your credit profile was stellar and you had a high FICO score before filing for bankruptcy, you should “expect a big drop in [your] score,” according to myFICO. But if your credit was already in the trenches due to negative items on your report, you would probably “only see a modest drop in [your] score,” the article adds. Read More…

Late payments can have a profound impact on your overall credit health.

But the ramifications can extend far beyond having to pay a late fee or penalty APR. Your payment history is the single most important factor that makes up your FICO score, which means that even a one-time payment made more than 30 days late can cause your score to plummet, even if you have been relatively responsible otherwise. With that in mind, you should strive to pay all your bills ahead of time or on time with no exceptions. Read More…

How to Deal With Medical Bills on Your Credit Report

Unpaid medical bills take longer to hit your credit report and are weighed less heavily in some scores, but they can affect your credit. A serious illness or injury can be disruptive. You need to heal, and you may be overwhelmed for a while as you put your work and family life back together. There’s a strong chance your finances will be affected, too. If an unpaid medical bill makes its way to your credit reports, your credit scores could suffer for years. (Read more about your options for paying medical bills)Read More…

Unlike removing late payments or collections, removing a foreclosure from your credit report will be difficult.

But it might be possible to remove a foreclosure from your credit report by following the three steps I list below. To follow these steps, you will need an up-to-date copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting agencies. You can get your free credit reports through www.annualcreditreport.com.

Ways to remove foreclosure from your credit report. Read More…
What is a recovery?

A repossession is the lender’s legal right to take property from you if you don’t pay the bill as agreed. The lender then tries to sell the property to recoup some of the money he lost. For example, if you miss three or four car payments and don’t contact the lender, your car will likely be taken over.                                                               Can a repossesion be removed from your credit report? Read More…

A write off on your credit report tells potential lenders that you are a risky borrower, so removing a write off from your credit report could help you qualify or get better rates on credit cards and loans. A cancellation is when you stop paying a debt and the creditor records your account as lost cause. It is rare for creditors or credit reporting agencies to remove a write-off from your credit report. You can either pay the canceled account in full or settle the debt. The steps to negotiate a cancellation agreement include:  Read More…

What is a Hard Inquiry?

A hard inquiry occurs when someone you plan to do business with, such as a lender, checks your credit report. They do this to understand the risk you pose as a potential borrower and how you have managed past debt obligations. Hard inquiries can lower your credit score by up to five points. While they stay on your credit report for two years, they only affect your score for one.

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